Maternal Figures
More than 50,000 women die during childbirth in Nigeria every year

Maternal Figures is a database of maternal health interventions implemented in Nigeria in the last 30 years. Developed as a research tool for journalists, the database contains verified information including funding sources, contact information, programme reports, and more.

The stages of maternal health care
Pregnancy

Pregnancy signals the physiological and psychological changes that occur over a period of 40 weeks. In Nigeria, 9.2 million women and girls become pregnant each year. Complications such as maternal hypertensive disorders contribute to maternal deaths during pregnancy. Our database includes interventions like the use of Conditional Cash Transfers which encourage pregnant women to attend health screenings in order to receive cash bonuses.

42
Pregnancy interventions in our database
26%
of pregnancy interventions are policy focused

Nigeria

Interventions

75

ACTIVE

/

150

TOTAL

Free Maternal Care?

No

Funders

75

Maternal Mortality Ratio

512

Per 100,000 live births
Interventions
0
41
Interventions
  • The intervention focused on advocacy and budget tracking for improved maternal health services, with an aim to reduce maternal mortality and morbidity in Kano, Bauchi and Sokoto states over three years.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed

    NA

    Community Health and Research Initiative


    Additional Information
    By 2012, Community Health and Research Initiative had conducted two analytical projects in Kano, Bauchi, and Sokoto state where maternal mortality rates are high (>1000 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births). The first entailed an analysis of state‐level budgets to compare allocations to health in relation to other development sectors. The findings showed that the health budget in Kano was less than those of the Ministries of Education and Agriculture. It was also below the 15% commitment made by African governments in the regional Abuja Health Declaration. A second project, the National Midwifery Service Scheme (MSS) Budget Analysis in Kano, compared financial commitments made by different levels of government to actual monthly allowances for midwives. Information was gathered through interviews with midwives to understand if they received the money and, if so, where it came from. This project also includes a comparison of budget allocations and service provision within health facilities where MSS is being implemented. Both activities are aimed at promoting efficient and transparent use of the limited amount of existing funds according to regulations under the new Free Maternal and Child Health Policy.
    Explore documents
    Any use of the information on this site and attached documents should attribute 'Maternal Figures'.
  • The Safe Motherhood Law aims to regulate best hospital practices for childbearing women and to protect them against harmful traditional practices. The law aims to provide safe maternity care and services in Kwara State, with the aim of initially reducing and finally eradicating maternal and newborn mortality.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Active

    NA

    Kwara State Government


    Additional Information
    To address the maternal mortality situation, the state government passed the Safe Motherhood Law and in 2010 launched the Integrated Health Records Card Programme. It also established the Community Health Insurance Scheme and launched the Malaria Free Kwara Campaign. All these were to help reduce the maternal mortality rate and contribute to the achievement of millennium development goal 5 - Improve Maternal health. The law allocated N2.5 million for family planning under the reproductive health budget line. Reports have stated that due to competing needs of other reproductive health services, the budgeted family planning funds were absorbed by other programmes and never disbursed for family planning purposes.
    Explore documents
    Any use of the information on this site and attached documents should attribute 'Maternal Figures'.
  • The team from the Payment Models for Emergency Transport Schemes for Obstetric Emergencies in Northern Nigeria (METS) programme tested how different incentives packages affected the performance and motivation of drivers involved in Emergency Transport Schemes in four states. Funded by a MacArthur Foundation grant, this two-year pilot was designed as an implementation research initiative, and aimed to generate evidence in support of an appropriately funded maternal health emergency transport policy.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed

    NA

    Health Partners International


    Additional Information
    A pilot study was conducted to determine which incentives the volunteer drivers would like, and to assess whether these affected their performance levels, and ultimately the sustainability of the emergency transport scheme. According to HPI and DAI, some of the key messages included: (1) Incentives, both cash and in-kind, were associated with higher performance among drivers involved in a transport scheme for women in need of emergency maternal health care. Incentives tested ranged from fuel vouchers, free vehicle servicing vouchers, and cash vouchers linked to distances traveled. (2) The average cost of the incentives per safe delivery or maternal death averted was $9.33. If the women’s families had paid for these trips, the average cost would have been much higher at between $30 and $49, depending on the state. (3) Some incentives worked better than others. The selection of incentives should be based on what drivers want, and the process to obtain them needs to be simple and accessible. (4) The provision of incentives did not appear to undermine the spirit of voluntarism among the drivers. Further research is needed into the long-term effects of incentives on volunteer activity.
    Explore documents
    Any use of the information on this site and attached documents should attribute 'Maternal Figures'.
  • Primary Health Care Under One Roof (PHCUOR) otherwise known as Integrated PHC Governance, is a primary health care (PHC) reform promoted by the Government of Nigeria to integrate the PHC structures and programs at sub-national levels, under one state-level body – the State Primary Health Care Development Agency or Board (SPHCDA/B) within the framework of a decentralized health system. The policy is based on the principle of “Three Ones”: One Management, One Plan and One Monitoring & Evaluation System.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Active

    NA

    National Primary Health Care Development Agency


    Additional Information
    The PHCUOR was initiated with support from DFID funded projects- Partnership for Transformation of Health Systems (PATHS 2005-2008) and Partnership for Reviving Routine Immunization in Northern Nigeria: Maternal Newborn and Child Health Initiative (PRINN-MNCH 2008-2014), became a national policy agenda following its endorsement by the 56th National Council on Health (NCH) in May 2011. The Council in its 58th Session in 2013 further approved the national guidelines and the policy document, for implementation, through its Resolution 29. The guidelines identify a conceptual framework for implementing the policy which consists of nine specific domains- Governance, Legislation, Minimum Service Package, Repositioning, Systems Development, Operational Guidelines, Human Resources, Funding Sources & Structure and Office Setup-and outlines specific steps and approaches involved in establishing a functional SPHCDA/B. a 2015 scorecard of the program noted that, in spite of the adoption of the Policy by the NCH, progress with implementation has been slow with States making varying degrees of progress on each domain.
    Explore documents
    Any use of the information on this site and attached documents should attribute 'Maternal Figures'.
  • ESMPIN focused on improving the health of women and children in Nigeria by increasing the use of modern family planning methods, antenatal care and child health products. Advocating for spousal support of antenatal care and family planning was also an integral part of the program.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed

    AID-620-A-11-00001

    Ikenyei Uche Chukwuka

    M&E Specialist USAID/Nigeria HPN Unit


    Additional Information
    NA
    Explore documents
    Any use of the information on this site and attached documents should attribute 'Maternal Figures'.

Know an intervention that we haven’t listed?

Submit Intervention
Disclaimer

The information contained on this website is for information purposes only. The information is provided from research conducted by Maternal Figures, and while we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express, or implied.

Newsletter

Sign up for our newsletter to receive updates about our work and be the first to know when we update our database.