Maternal Figures
More than 50,000 women die during childbirth in Nigeria every year

Maternal Figures is a database of maternal health interventions implemented in Nigeria in the last 30 years. Developed as a research tool for journalists, the database contains verified information including funding sources, contact information, programme reports, and more.

The stages of maternal health care
Pregnancy

Pregnancy signals the physiological and psychological changes that occur over a period of 40 weeks. In Nigeria, 9.2 million women and girls become pregnant each year. Complications such as maternal hypertensive disorders contribute to maternal deaths during pregnancy. Our database includes interventions like the use of Conditional Cash Transfers which encourage pregnant women to attend health screenings in order to receive cash bonuses.

42
Pregnancy interventions in our database
26%
of pregnancy interventions are policy focused

Nigeria

Interventions

75

ACTIVE

/

150

TOTAL

Free Maternal Care?

No

Funders

75

Maternal Mortality Ratio

512

Per 100,000 live births
Interventions
0
41
Interventions
  • Following the impact of the Nigerian Urban Reproductive Health initiative, NURHI 2 aims to ensure a positive shift in family planning social norms in Lagos, Kaduna, and Oyo States, specifically. The initiative aims continue to eliminate supply and demand barriers to contraceptive use and make family planning a social norm in Nigeria.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed

    NA

    Nigerian Urban Reproductive Health Initiative


    Additional Information
    NURHI 2 aims at achieving a 12.5% increase in contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR) in its implementation states,ultimately contributing to the Nigerian Government modern CPR goal of 27% by 2020. CPR is defined as percentage of women between 15 and 49 years who are currently using or whose sexual partners are using at least one form of contraception regardless of the method (WHO), while mCPR refers to the percentage of those women who are currently using or whose sexual partners are using a modern contraceptive method.
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  • Global Library of Women's Medicine (GLOWM) is an educational platform of the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO). The Global Library’s animated video series contains animated videos assigned to assist women in understanding pregnancy and childbirth in three different Nigerian languages: Yoruba, Igbo, and Hansa. These 15 short animated videos were distributed across Nigeria to assess how useful they are in educating women about key issues related to pregnancy and childbirth. The Safer Motherhood App is a mobile app by the The Global Library of Women’s Medicine, which is the educational platform of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics. The free app aims to provide details of practical clinical experience to healthcare professionals concerned with the management of obstetric emergencies.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Active

    NA

    Global Library of Women's Medicine


    Additional Information
    According to The Global Library of Women’s Medicine, the app allows midwives and doctors to store patient records securely and to share them with their clinic. GLOWM also noted that the app was developed over a 4-year period, following an original request from the World Health Organisation (African Region).
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  • In 2014, The Women’s Health and Action Research Centre (WHARC) obtained a competitive grant from the World Health Organization (WHO) to implement for improving the quality of emergency obstetric care in Nigeria. One of the project's aims included describing the provision of emergency obstetrics care as it was delivered in six secondary and two tertiary hospitals, in the following causes of maternal mortality in two geo-political zones of Nigeria: primary postpartum haemorrhage, eclampsia, and obstructed labour,

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed

    NA

    Women's Health and Action Research Centre


    Additional Information
    Other objectives included the implementation of a set of evidence-based multi-faceted interventions for the improvement of the quality of care for primary postpartum haemorrhage, eclampsia and obstructed labour in four of the selected hospitals (three secondary hospitals and one tertiary hospital) as well as testing the effectiveness of the intervention package by comparing maternal and neonatal outcomes and process quality indicators in the four intervention hospitals with four comparable control hospitals in the same geo-political zones.
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  • This project will test and implement universal home visits that address gaps across pilot sites in Nigeria as a strategy to improve maternal and child health. The methodology involves a large-scale cluster randomized controlled trial to measure the impact of strategies for implementing home visits and video education tools (video edutainment) within the country's health services.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Active

    108039

    Dr Anne Cockcroft

    Department of Family Medicine, McGill University


    Additional Information
    The “treatment” is a package of structural interventions implemented in the five districts allocated to the first wave. The study tests the impact on mothers’ health of visiting all pregnant women every two months during their pregnancy and after delivery. In the visits, the female visitors ask them some questions about their health and discuss with them evidence about some problems that affect the outcome of pregnancy, and that can be tackled within the household: domestic violence, heavy work during pregnancy, lack of knowledge about danger signs of pregnancy, and lack of communication about pregnancy between women and their partners. Male workers visit the partners of the pregnant women to have the same discussions. The home visitors advise women with danger signs in their pregnancy to visit a health facility and provide a referral note for them. In half of the wards, the home visitors also show video clips to help the discussions about the problems that affect pregnancy outcomes.
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  • ỌMỌMI Mobile web and app is a health and social platform based on the WHO/UNICEF Childhood Survival Strategies, which has a unique range of features that helps parents keep their children healthy by enabling them easily monitor their children’s health. With the app, mothers can ask health questions anonymously and receive answers from medical professionals.The app also includes guidance on family planning, breastfeeding, food supplementation and diarrhea management and tools like a fertility calculator and child immunization and growth trackers. The app also features a community forum that allows users to support each other and share best practice. OMOMI is part of MOBIcure, a company that uses technological solutions to solve pressing health issues in Nigeria.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Active

    NA

    Emmanuel Owobu

    Co-founder, ỌMỌMI


    Additional Information
    NA
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Disclaimer

The information contained on this website is for information purposes only. The information is provided from research conducted by Maternal Figures, and while we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express, or implied.

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