Maternal Figures
More than 50,000 women die during childbirth in Nigeria every year

Maternal Figures is a database of maternal health interventions implemented in Nigeria in the last 30 years. Developed as a research tool for journalists, the database contains verified information including funding sources, contact information, programme reports, and more.

The stages of maternal health care
Pregnancy

Pregnancy signals the physiological and psychological changes that occur over a period of 40 weeks. In Nigeria, 9.2 million women and girls become pregnant each year. Complications such as maternal hypertensive disorders contribute to maternal deaths during pregnancy. Our database includes interventions like the use of Conditional Cash Transfers which encourage pregnant women to attend health screenings in order to receive cash bonuses.

42
Pregnancy interventions in our database
26%
of pregnancy interventions are policy focused

Nigeria

Interventions

75

ACTIVE

/

150

TOTAL

Free Maternal Care?

No

Funders

75

Maternal Mortality Ratio

512

Per 100,000 live births
Interventions
0
41
Interventions
  • Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) is the early, prolonged, and continuous skin-to-skin contact between the mother (or substitute) and her baby, both in hospital and after early discharge, with support for positioning, feeding (ideally exclusive breastfeeding), and prevention and management of infections and breathing difficulties.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Active

    NA

    Federal Ministry of Health


    Additional Information
    KMC was first introduced to Nigeria in the late 1990s through a resident pediatrician at the University of Lagos Teaching Hospital. A training workshop was held with doctors and nurses from 16 teaching hospitals across the country. In Nigeria, Kangaroo Mother Care as a method for caring for small babies was systematically reintroduced in Kano and Zamfara through the ACCESS/USAID program in 2007. KMC was incorporated in the Integrated Maternal Newborn and Child Health (IMNCH) strategy of the FMOH in 2007. KMC was also included in the integrated Facility‐Based Newborn Care package developed by the FMOH in 2014. The FMOH in the Situation Analysis and Action Plan for Newborn Health in 2011 committed to create a budget line that included the creation of six zonal KMC centers as part of the comprehensive newborn care strategy to achieve the MDGs. However, as at 2017 this had not been achieved.
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  • The Fistula Care Project is the largest U.S. government-funded focused on the treatment and prevention of fistula. Since the Fistula Care project began in 2007, the project has focused on preventing and treating obstetric fistula in Nigeria. According to USAID, the Fistula Care project trained more than 450 Nigerian nurses and doctors to perform fistula repair surgery, and supported 10,284 fistula repair surgeries.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed

    GHS-A-00-07-00021-00

    EngenderHealth


    Additional Information
    NA
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  • The Community Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS) was implemented in 2007 at Shonga in Edu LGA during Bukola Saraki's term as Governor. The aim of the CHIS was to make quality healthcare services readily available, accessible, acceptable and affordable to the majority of Kwarans, most of whom live in rural areas.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Active

    NA

    Kwara State Government


    Additional Information
    In 2018, Kwara Governor, Abdulfatah Ahmed, announced the State Health Insurance Scheme (KHIS) which builds off the CHIS. The governor said that the state government had set aside an initial N200 million for its take-off. He added that the government had also committed to contributing one percent of its annual Consolidated Revenue Fund and to subsidise premiums and service delivery to those considered part of the poorest in the society. Furthermore, Mr Ahmed said the government will boost the scheme with 40 percent of funds received through the “Saving One Million Lives Performance for Results Initiative”, a programme of the Federal Ministry of Health supported by the World Bank and targeted at improving maternal and child health in Nigeria.
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  • In response to the challenges of high MMR in the State, the Enugu State government initiated a policy on free maternal and child health (FMCH) care in 2007, as a flagship of its maternal health programmes. The FMCH provides free medical, antenatal, delivery and postnatal care for poor women and children in primary and secondary hospitals, and those referred to tertiary hospitals in the State.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Active

    NA

    Dr. Ndubuisi Michael Ejeh

    Director, Medical Services, Enugu State Ministry of Health


    Additional Information
    In a 2014 news article, a Traditional ruler of Nome Unateze, Nkanu East Council of Enugu state, pointed out that the free maternal and child health care being run by the state government had eluded his community as the service was not available in the area. In response, a member of the State Assembly and chairman, House Committee on health, said that the state government had begun the employment of 150 midwives and additional 20 doctors to be posted to the rural areas. He also stressed that patronage of the program was low and that one council had recorded eight percent of attendants so far.
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  • With funds derived from the Debt Relief Grant provided to Nigeria in 2005, the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) in partnership with the Office of the Senior Special Adviser to the Present on the Millennium Development Goals implemented a fee exemption scheme to provide access to essential maternal and health care to pregnant women and children under-five years in several states across the country. Expected outcomes included the elimination of financial barriers in accessing health care for over 1.5 million pregnant women and children under the age of 5, and reducing the out-of pocket expenses from 66 to 60 per cent according to the target set in the Nigerian Strategic Health Development Plan.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Closed

    NA

    National Health Insurance Scheme


    Additional Information
    The project was implemented in 3 phases starting with 6 pilot states (1 per geopolitical zone). Initially it covered 6 LGAs per state except Bayelsa where it covered all the 7 LGAs. It was scaled up to 12 states in the 2nd and final phases of the project when additional states were included. Although Ekiti was later included but implementation did not commence before the program ended. The project was funded from Debt Relief Gains through the Presidential MDGs Office. Phase one was funded with 5 billion Naira (about US$33 million) while phase two was funded at 4.25 billion Naira (about US$28 million). The project was managed at state levels by State Implementation Committee (state officials and NHIS technical staff). The plan was for the federal government to contribute 60% while states were expected to contribute 40% counterpart funds to cover the project costs.
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Disclaimer

The information contained on this website is for information purposes only. The information is provided from research conducted by Maternal Figures, and while we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express, or implied.

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