Maternal Figures
More than 50,000 women die during childbirth in Nigeria every year

Maternal Figures is a database of maternal health interventions implemented in Nigeria in the last 30 years. Developed as a research tool for journalists, the database contains verified information including funding sources, contact information, programme reports, and more.

The stages of maternal health care
Pregnancy

Pregnancy signals the physiological and psychological changes that occur over a period of 40 weeks. In Nigeria, 9.2 million women and girls become pregnant each year. Complications such as maternal hypertensive disorders contribute to maternal deaths during pregnancy. Our database includes interventions like the use of Conditional Cash Transfers which encourage pregnant women to attend health screenings in order to receive cash bonuses.

42
Pregnancy interventions in our database
26%
of pregnancy interventions are policy focused

Nigeria

Interventions

75

ACTIVE

/

150

TOTAL

Free Maternal Care?

No

Funders

75

Maternal Mortality Ratio

512

Per 100,000 live births
Interventions
0
41
Interventions
  • Based on data and lessons learned from the Rotarian Action Group for Population and Development's (RFPD) pilot project, RFPD introduced systematic measures of Obstetric Quality Assurance (OQA)/Maternal and Perinatal Death Surveillance and Response (MPDSR). In 2014, a digital platform - NOQA Network - was subsequently developed to assist in the aggregation and analysis of salient medical data.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Active

    NA

    Dr Adedolapo Lufadeju

    National Coordinator of the Rotarian Action Group for Population and Development (RFPD) in Nigeria


    Additional Information
    According to a 2020 news article, RPFD launched the digital Obstetric Quality Assurance model in 10 hospitals. The tool measures three standards of quality: structure, process and outcome. Improvements in the outcome (the health of mothers and babies) are achieved by analysing the processes — the skills and qualifications of medical personnel handling mothers. The tool also includes a module for tracking the supply chain for family planning on a monthly basis. It displays modern contraceptive prevalence rates for long and short term acting commodities, reflecting the degree of stock outs at facility, community, local government, state, zonal and national levels. According to RFPD, this system allowed medical and administrative staff to reduce maternal and child mortality in project hospitals through targeted response measures: fetal mortality declined by 15% between 2008-2010; maternal mortality declined by 37% since 2010.
    Explore documents
    Any use of the information on this site and attached documents should attribute 'Maternal Figures'.
  • SAQIP aimed to strengthen public health systems, improve quality of care, build community engagement and empower women economically with Pact's WORTH model so they could better provide for their own health and that of their children. Specifically, the project worked to build the capacity of the State Primary Health Care Development Agency and its Local Government Authority structures to carry out their mandate to provide quality maternal, neonatal and child health services through public health centers. SAQIP also worked to boost the use of services and community participation in the public health system.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed

    NA

    PACT Institute


    Additional Information
    According to a report by The Daily Trust, the project reported a 250% increase in availability of life-saving MNCH commodities, reached some 46,000 women of child-bearing age with MNCH-related education. Nigeria Health Watch reported that SAPIQ trained staff of Gombe State Primary Health Care Development Agency and supported Society for Family Health in the formation of women groups. They formed 1,800 women groups across the 57 intervention wards with each group having over 25 members. According to SAPIQ, over 45,000 women of childbearing age formed these groups and contributed a total of NGN 157,742,478 between 2015 and 2019 to help each other and provide soft loans to start up or expand their businesses. This reportedly increased the ability of women to pay for MNCH services.
    Explore documents
    Any use of the information on this site and attached documents should attribute 'Maternal Figures'.
  • The overarching goal of the Maternal and Child Survival Program (MCSP) in Nigeria was to contribute to the reduction of maternal, newborn, and child mortality by improving the quality and use of maternal, newborn, and child health interventions in Ebonyi and Kogi states. Over a period of 4 years, MCSP worked with several key stakeholders within and outside Nigeria to plan and implement a wide range of interventions designed to achieve this goal. The Program’s focus was to address the major causes of maternal, newborn, and child mortality at the health facility level. This effort led to strengthening the capacity of more than 3,800 health workers across 321 facilities to deliver quality reproductive, maternal, newborn, child, and adolescent health services. Trained health workers have been applying their new skills to provide lifesaving care.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed

    AID-OAA-A-14-00028

    Dr. Oniyire Adetiloye

    Project Director, JHPIEGO Corporation


    Additional Information
    During MCSP’s implementation, trained health workers conducted 71,665 deliveries, resuscitated 1,938 newborns who did not breathe at birth, and treated 59,756 cases of childhood pneumonia, diarrhea, and uncomplicated malaria. Trained providers also increased voluntary family planning uptake in the states by serving 19,823 women, including adolescents and young mothers, with preferred contraceptives.
    Explore documents
    Any use of the information on this site and attached documents should attribute 'Maternal Figures'.
  • HelloMama aimed to improve health outcomes for pregnant women, newborns, children under 1-year-old, and their families through a mobile messaging platform that complements the efforts of frontline health workers. According to USAID reports of the project, ‘HelloMama’ activity delivered vital health information to nearly 50,000 pregnant women, new mothers, and their families in Cross River and Ebonyi states via text and voice messages.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed

    Cooperative Agreement #AID-OAA-A-14-00028

    Joy Hadiza Marcus

    Senior Program Manager, MCSP-HelloMAMA


    Additional Information
    According to Hello Mama, Cross River State committed N40 million ($110,000) to sustain the delivery of HelloMama text and audio messages. As of May 2019, the Ebonyi state Ministry of Health commitments to do the same were still underway.
    Explore documents
    Any use of the information on this site and attached documents should attribute 'Maternal Figures'.
  • Saving Mothers, Giving Life was launched in 2012 to test an integrated health systems approach that addresses the “three delays” associated with maternal and newborn deaths. The initiative aimed to achieve a 50 percent decrease in maternal mortality and 30 percent decrease in neonatal mortality between 2012 and 2017 by working towards four outcomes, which include an increased use of services and improved self-care, timelier access to appropriate care, quality and experience of care, and a more robust and resilient health system. The program began with four districts in Uganda and four in Zambia. Over the next few years, the program expanded in both countries and, in 2015, to Cross River state, Nigeria. In Nigeria, the project's goal was to achieve a 25 percent reduction in maternal mortality ratio and a 35 percent reduction in neonatal mortality rate by 2019

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed

    AID-OAA-A-11-00024

    Pathfinder International Nigeria


    Additional Information
    Community Based Organizations received program management training and technical support from the project and worked to generate demand for quality maternal and newborn health and antenatal care services through a community-based health volunteer cadre, education and awareness campaigns, and integrating safe motherhood messaging in existing services (e.g., malaria and HIV and AIDS campaigns) and activities (e.g., prioritization of safe motherhood messages in community development committee meetings). Community-based organizations trained and monitored community health volunteers to increase maternal and newborn health awareness—including identification of danger signs—and to link community members to facility based care. To ensure women reach appropriate facilities and services in a timely manner, the project scaled up facilities to provide EmONC services, focused on strengthening the community-based health workforce by preparing community health extension workers to provide select services, piloted a digital health system, and supported development of an emergency transport system. According to USAID, since 2015, the multi-country activity, implemented in Nigeria by Pathfinder International, well surpassed its initial targets and helped reduce maternal and newborn mortality by 66 and 47 percent, respectively, in the 108 Cross River communities where it operates with funding from USAID, as well as another 30 private hospitals funded by MSD for Mothers.
    Explore documents
    Any use of the information on this site and attached documents should attribute 'Maternal Figures'.

Know an intervention that we haven’t listed?

Submit Intervention
Disclaimer

The information contained on this website is for information purposes only. The information is provided from research conducted by Maternal Figures, and while we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express, or implied.

Newsletter

Sign up for our newsletter to receive updates about our work and be the first to know when we update our database.