Maternal Figures
More than 50,000 women die during childbirth in Nigeria every year

Maternal Figures is a database of maternal health interventions implemented in Nigeria in the last 30 years. Developed as a research tool for journalists, the database contains verified information including funding sources, contact information, programme reports, and more.

The stages of maternal health care
Pregnancy

Pregnancy signals the physiological and psychological changes that occur over a period of 40 weeks. In Nigeria, 9.2 million women and girls become pregnant each year. Complications such as maternal hypertensive disorders contribute to maternal deaths during pregnancy. Our database includes interventions like the use of Conditional Cash Transfers which encourage pregnant women to attend health screenings in order to receive cash bonuses.

42
Pregnancy interventions in our database
26%
of pregnancy interventions are policy focused

Nigeria

Interventions

75

ACTIVE

/

150

TOTAL

Free Maternal Care?

No

Funders

75

Maternal Mortality Ratio

512

Per 100,000 live births
Interventions
0
41
Interventions
  • PATHS 1 supported local initiatives to strengthen government stewardship in health policy, planning and financing; improve management in public health, particularly at the local level; raise quality standards of preventative and curative services, particularly in the areas of malaria, TB, reproductive health and sexually transmitted infections, safe motherhood and childhood illnesses; and raise awareness of people’s entitlement to good quality, affordable care and increase their ability to prevent and manage certain health conditions. Some PATHS 1 initiatives included: Increasing access strategies for safe motherhood services, feasibility studies looking at the provision of free emergency obstetric care (EOC) services, Managing health safety net schemes and creating options for expanding a safe motherhood emergency transport scheme. As a result,Transaid implemented an Emergency Transport Scheme in Jigawa under the auspices of this intervention.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed

    NA

    DAI in UK


    Additional Information
    NA
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  • Ebonyi State introduced Free Maternal and Child Health Care Programme (FMCHCP) in 2003 in secondary and tertiary public and faith based health facilities. The services involved in the FMCHCP include free antenatal care (ANC) including card and antenatal drugs, free vaginal and assisted vaginal delivery (forceps and vacuum), free caesarean section (elective and emergency), free post abortion care services, free management of ectopic pregnancy and free laparotomy for obstetric complications.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Active

    NA

    Ogbonna Igboji

    Director, Nursing and Midwifery Services - Ebonyi State


    Additional Information
    As a result of the commitment of Ebonyi State government to addressing the high maternal mortality, the FMCHCP was introduced in the State in 2003 under the leadership of Governor Sam Egwu. The programme was however limited to the Ebonyi State University Teaching Hospital located in Abakaliki, the State capital. Although the package was comprehensive and consisted of complete obstetric care including emergency obstetric care (EOC) to the beneficiaries, unfortunately the target group, poor rural dwellers, were missed due to lack of awareness, bad road networks, poverty, first and second level delays, etc. His Excellency, Governor Martin Elechi, in a bid to revamp the FMCHCP and make it more functional and accessible, extended the services to all the major secondary health facilities located in the 13 local government areas in the State.
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  • Pathfinder launched the Sustainable Maternal Health Care Improvement Initiative in 2003 to address Nigeria’s high maternal mortality and morbidity rates. The project’s approach sought to improve health system and community structures to enable sustainable change in the quality and coordination of maternal health service delivery, and to shape maternal health care-seeking behavior among key populations.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed

    NA

    Farouk Jega

    Country Representative, Pathfinder International


    Additional Information
    The project targeted specific communities in the respective states, working with the Minjibir community in Kano, the Agbowa community in Lagos, and the Gwoza community in Borno to engage stakeholders in local-level problem solving to address barriers to quality health care service delivery and behaviors related to positive maternal health outcomes.
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  • The Campaign to End Fistula ”Obstetric Fistula Needs Assessment Report: Findings from Nine African Countries“—contains results from a groundbreaking needs assessment conducted by EngenderHealth and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) in nine African countries. According to the report, 30% of women in Nigeria receive no antenatal treatment at all, with adolescent mothers and those who live in rural areas particularly unlikely to receive care. The report also noted that the majority of women in the country suffer fistula at a young age, most often in conjunction with their first vaginal delivery, with stillbirth as a common result.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed

    OPP26473

    Engender Health


    Additional Information
    NA
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  • The Second Health Systems Development Project (HSDP II) worked to support all 36 states in Nigeria to improve the country's maternal and child health status. The objective of the project included improving the delivery of primary and secondary health care services with a particular focus on maternal and child health and reproductive health services in Participating States; and strengthening, at the Federal level, policy formulation and delivery of secondary health care services with a particular focus on maternal and child health and further developing a system to monitor the performance of the health sector . Indicators for project success included an Increased proportion of births attended to by skilled and trained health personnel (% increase in number of births attended by skilled and trained health personnel of total number of births) and an increased percentage of pregnant women attending antenatal clinics. In a 2012 report of the projects results, the outcome of the project was rated "Moderately Unsatisfactory" and Nigeria's performance as a borrower was also rated "Moderately Unsatisfactory" The original Development Credit agreement in the amount of SDR 101.8 million (US$127 million), was approved on June 6, 2002. It became effective on May 23, 2003 and the original closing date was December 31, 2006. In 2008, additional financing in the amount of US$90 million was proposed.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed

    P070290

    Dr. Shehu Sule

    Director, Health Planning & Research


    Additional Information
    The original Project consisted of three Parts - Part A: Strengthening Capacity for System Management at State Level. Each state was to receive US$1.5 million to strengthen capacity at State Ministries of Health to improve budget management processes, develop health accounts, increase the autonomy of local health facilities through service agreements, and carry out annual performance reviews to discuss results and share lessons learned with stakeholders. Human resources were to be developed through training on maternal and child health and communicable disease control, and improved quality of training programs in schools of nursing, midwifery and health technology. The health management information system (HMIS) was to be strengthened to improve access to information for decision making. Access to information technology and communications was to be enhanced through improvements to internet and technology access . Studies and technical audits were to be implemented. Part B: Strengthening Delivery of Priority Health Services. The delivery of primary health care services and disease control were to be improved through the provision of training and equipment. Essential drugs were to be supplied to health facilities. The quality of training in nursing, midwifery and health technology schools was to be improved, and selected schools were to be rehabilitated. Part C: Capacity Strengthening at Federal Level and Project Coordination, Monitoring and Evaluation. This Part was to support the formulation of health policies and strategies and the implementation of health reforms; the implementation of the National HMIS and annual health sector performance assessments; promotion of research on health care financing, and research, studies and audits on key systemic issues; and Project Management, coordination and evaluation, including assisting Participating States, consolidation of annual work programs, reports, and accounts, monitoring progress in Project implementation, and providing information to the National Project Steering Committee. Additional Financing: Project restructuring in 2005 changed the fund allocation to States, and funds were pooled for all States in one pool. However, some States had overspent their allocations, leading to a funding gap that was financed by Additional Financing in 2008. Roughly 50% of the Additional Financing was to support civil works (completing the rehabilitation of health training institutions and primary health care (PHC) centers and provision of water); 30% was for service delivery, including commodities and equipment; and 20% was for systems development (e.g. M&E) and capacity building at the state and facility level .
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Disclaimer

The information contained on this website is for information purposes only. The information is provided from research conducted by Maternal Figures, and while we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express, or implied.

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