Maternal Figures
More than 50,000 women die during childbirth in Nigeria every year

Maternal Figures is a database of maternal health interventions implemented in Nigeria in the last 30 years. Developed as a research tool for journalists, the database contains verified information including funding sources, contact information, programme reports, and more.

The stages of maternal health care
Pregnancy

Pregnancy signals the physiological and psychological changes that occur over a period of 40 weeks. In Nigeria, 9.2 million women and girls become pregnant each year. Complications such as maternal hypertensive disorders contribute to maternal deaths during pregnancy. Our database includes interventions like the use of Conditional Cash Transfers which encourage pregnant women to attend health screenings in order to receive cash bonuses.

42
Pregnancy interventions in our database
26%
of pregnancy interventions are policy focused

Nigeria

Interventions

75

ACTIVE

/

150

TOTAL

Free Maternal Care?

No

Funders

75

Maternal Mortality Ratio

512

Per 100,000 live births
Interventions
0
41
Interventions
  • To support the capacity of the National Products Supply Chain Management Programme (NPSCMP), the Nigeria Supply Chain Integration Project (NSCIP) was created in 2014 with funding from The Global Fund, USAID, UNFPA and other partners. NSCIP is managed by NPSCMP and its implementation partner, the i+solutions-led consortium; its purpose is to expedite the integration of supply chains across the various disease programmes while building capacity at federal, state, and local government level for enhanced visibility, control and efficient last mile distribution (LMD) of health commodities. A main component of the NSCIP aims to establish functional Logistics Management Coordination Units (LMCUs) and deploy Logistics Management Information Systems (LMIS); first within the 36+1 states and then down to the local logistics management coordination units (LLMCUs) at the LGA level. To begin, the project is being piloted in 13 states and the Federal Capital Territory which have a high prevalence of disease, federal spread and ease of access to key logistics infrastructure key criteria. Lessons learnt and quick wins will be replicated in other 23 states of the federation.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Active
    Additional Information
    A UNFPA reported noted that the aim of NSCIP is to accelerate the integration of supply chains for the five public health programmes and build efforts in 14 “pilot” states for eventual national scale-up. According to the report, its vision is to improve access to commodities through an efficient and harmonized LMD system, with visibility at all levels (Federal, State, LGA and SDP) and for all commodities across donors/programmes, within both the public and private sectors. Commodities will be privately managed by 3PLs through a zonal arrangement of six axial warehouses which will bypass State warehouses and distribute directly to SDPs. NSCIP has established Logistics Management Coordination Units (LMCUs) in all 36+1 states and rollout to the LGAs has begun. The project began with identifying areas of supply chain management needing support by having interviews with stakeholders regarding RH/FP service delivery access issues, including those related to commodity security. The annual facility surveys supported by UNFPA provide important information on the prevalence of stock-outs at the primary, secondary and tertiary levels of the system, the availability of a range of contraceptive methods and life-saving maternal health/reproductive health medicines, as well as the utilization of logistics forms, frequency of training in logistics management and supervisory visits.
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  • The Lagos State Health Scheme (LSHS) was established by law in May 2015. The scheme is a health insurance program that is targeted at ensuring that all residents of the State have access to quality, affordable and equitable health care. According to the Lagos State Government, expectant mothers have additional benefits on the scheme. This includes neonatal services, gynecological prenatal care and delivery, blood transfusion for maternal cases only and family planning services.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Active

    NA

    Lagos State Health Insurance Scheme


    Additional Information
    According to March 2019 interview with Dr. Peju Adenusi, General Manager of the Lagos State Health Management Agency, the insurance premium per year for a family of six is N40, 000, while it is N8,500 for single individuals. For families larger than six, every additional family member less than 18 years is N6,000 per person, per year. According to Dr. Adenusi, if the person is above 18 years of age, it will be N8,500 per person per year.
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  • The King College London’s CRADLE team developed a simple ‘Vital Signs Alert’ (VSA) device that measures blood pressure and pulse and calculates the risk of preeclampsia and shock. Results are displayed on a traffic light, alerting health care providers to those at risk. The CRADLE VSA has been developed to meet WHO criteria for use in a low resource setting, being accurate, low cost, robust and portable. The trials were conducted in 5 clusters in Ogun State, Nigeria.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed

    NA

    Peter von Dadelszen

    , MBChB, DPhil University of British Columbia


    Additional Information
    According to the clinical trial, the mHealth application is to be used by community health workers in intervention clusters to guide collection of relevant clinical data during antenatal visits. This clinical data is used to generate a risk estimate for any women with hypertension based on the miniPIERS (Pre-eclampsia Integrated Estimate of Risk) clinical risk prediction model. This risk estimate in combination with other pre-defined treatment triggers (severe hypertension (>160mmHg systolic) or proteinuria (>3+ dipstick); absence of fetal movements for greater than 12 hours; signs of recent stroke of seizure) are collected in the app and based on this data recommendations for care of the woman are provided.
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  • In 2016, the MTN Foundation carried out a Maternal Ward Support Program where it renovated 24 maternal centres in six beneficiary states to complement the national objective of reducing maternal and infant mortality in Nigeria. According to the approved estimates of the Abia state 2018 - 2020 multi-year budgets, the Abia State University Teaching Hospital (ABSUTH) was equipped with Neonatal incubators, Hospital Beds and Furniture through the partnership with MTN.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Active
    Additional Information
    NA
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  • Planned Parenthood Federation of Nigeria trained women as community resources to support reproductive health education and distribute safe birth kits to expectant mothers in northern Nigeria. Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab evaluated the effectiveness of the intervention. The MacArthur-supported projects aimed to encourage safe delivery practices and to help address a gap in research by connecting kit distribution with community resources.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed
    Additional Information
    An analysis published in the journal PLOS One showed that only about 10 percent of eligible women received a birth kit; about 50 percent of those women used the kits; and those who used the kits had a slightly higher rate of complications than others. Researchers hypothesize that this outcome may be the result of kits being used as a replacement for formal health care, and they suggest further research is needed on the impact of birth kits, especially in communities that use formal health care at low rates.
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Disclaimer

The information contained on this website is for information purposes only. The information is provided from research conducted by Maternal Figures, and while we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express, or implied.

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