Maternal Figures
More than 50,000 women die during childbirth in Nigeria every year

Maternal Figures is a database of maternal health interventions implemented in Nigeria in the last 30 years. Developed as a research tool for journalists, the database contains verified information including funding sources, contact information, programme reports, and more.

The stages of maternal health care
Pregnancy

Pregnancy signals the physiological and psychological changes that occur over a period of 40 weeks. In Nigeria, 9.2 million women and girls become pregnant each year. Complications such as maternal hypertensive disorders contribute to maternal deaths during pregnancy. Our database includes interventions like the use of Conditional Cash Transfers which encourage pregnant women to attend health screenings in order to receive cash bonuses.

42
Pregnancy interventions in our database
26%
of pregnancy interventions are policy focused

Nigeria

Interventions

75

ACTIVE

/

150

TOTAL

Free Maternal Care?

No

Funders

75

Maternal Mortality Ratio

512

Per 100,000 live births
Interventions
0
41
Interventions
  • In 2008, SFH received funding from a Large Anonymous Donor (LAD) through Population Services International (PSI) to implement a nationwide family planning project with specific emphasis on long acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs). This was to be implemented in the private sector. SFH subsequently recruited providers from the private sector across 22 states of the federation from all the six geo political zones. By 2010, SFH had organised and trained providers in over 200 private facilities across the selected states to implement LARC services. This gave rise to the first Social Franchise organisation in Nigeria then called the Happy Mothers Network. The Happy Mothers Network was the second phase of the larger Women's Health Network project implemented by the Society for Family Health. The main goals of the Happy Mother's Network were to expand the child spacing options, particularly long term methods such as IUCD and Implants among women of reproductive age (18-45 years), provide Post Abortion Care services which is a series of medical and related interventions designed to manage the complications of miscarriages and incomplete spontaneous abortion (both safe and unsafe), and address women’s related health – care needs by the use of Misoprostol in the medical management.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed

    NA

    Society for Family Health


    Additional Information
    According to the Society for Family Health, there are 308 Women's Health Project partner facilities with The Happy Mother’s Network across the 22 WHP states and the project planned to scale up to other states in the course of the project. The main implementation strategies of WHP were Service delivery at WHP partner facilities and the conduct of Clinic Support Days in these facilities as well as reach rural community members through the demand creation agents in the communities. As a result of the project's advocacy, WHP and other Reproductive Health stakeholders led the Federal Ministry of Health to include, for the first time, a budgetary line of US $3M dollars for the purchase of family planning commodities. In addition, Misoprostol distribution for Post Abortion Care services achieved about 99% of the target; this is largely due to more result – oriented detailing activities. The network was highly successful in organising providers in the private sector, building their capacity in Long acting contraceptives (IUCD and Implants), and building a robust demand generation team of interpersonal communications agents (IPCs) that created demand and mobilised clients to these facilities. By 2010, SFH, through the Happy Mothers Network had provided over 48,000 IUDs and 4500 implants through the network.
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  • Community Health and Research Initiative worked with 10 local governments and the Kano state government to reposition their commitment to addressing maternal mortality and morbidity through improved budgetary allocation and service delivery over 32 months.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed

    NA

    Community Health and Research Initiative


    Additional Information
    NA
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  • The Partnership for Transforming Health Systems Phase II (PATHS2) was a national programme funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID) to strengthen Nigeria’s health system. The goal of PATHS2 was to support Nigeria in using its own resources efficiently and effectively to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) set for the country. The purpose was to improve the planning, financing and delivery of sustainable and replicable pro-poor services for common health problems in up to six States across the country.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed
    Additional Information
    The PATHS 2 programme established five key outputs or deliverables, each supporting a different aspect of the health sector: (1) Strengthened stewardship role for health at the National level (2) Improved State systems to support appropriate health services (3) Improved delivery of and access to health services and supplies. (4) Engaged citizens and civil society to increase the accountability and responsiveness of the health system (5) Strengthened citizens to make informed choices about prevention, treatment and care
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  • According to a September 2019 report by The Nation, the Lagos State Government has built eight MCCs across the state from 2008 till date. The centres are said to have five clinics for mothers, babies and children, in addition to having a neonatal unit for premature babies, labour ward with delivery room, emergency clinic, a theatre for Caesarean section during complicated deliveries. The idea for MCC's originated in 2007 during Babatunde Fashola's tenure as governor of the state. According to the former governor, the aim of the program was to take maternal and child care close to the people while improving the quality of that care to the highest possible level.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Active

    NA

    Lagos State Ministry of Health


    Additional Information
    In a blog, former governor Babatunde Fashola noted that the administration conceived the idea of Maternal and Child Care Centres (MCCs) and designed them as 100 bed facilities to be located in strategic areas of the State to reduce the travel time to, and the pressure on Massey Street Children's Hospital and the Island Maternity, both of which are located in Lagos Island which are visited by women and children from diverse part of the State.
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  • The Midwives Service Scheme was developed in 2009 under the 2009 Appropriation Act. It aimed to deploy new, unemployed & retired midwives to primary health care facilities in rural communities around the country. The goal was to double the number of deliveries attended to by skilled birth attendants and lower maternal & infant mortality in target areas by 60 percent by December 2015. By 2010, more than 2,500 midwives had been deployed to primary healthcare facilities across the country. Phase 1 of the MSS took place in 652 primary care clinics across all of Nigeria’s 36 states, serving more than 10 million people.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Closed

    NA

    National Primary Health Care Agency


    Additional Information
    News reports showed that funding for the program, which was initially secured from the MDG - Debt Relief Gains, began to run out. And states and local governments were unable to pay midwives in local health centers. The scheme came to an indefinite halt in October of 2015. Some states absorbed midwives who were already working at health centers into their system. In states in the North, partner agencies worked to fill a training gap for midwives.
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Disclaimer

The information contained on this website is for information purposes only. The information is provided from research conducted by Maternal Figures, and while we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express, or implied.

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