Maternal Figures
More than 50,000 women die during childbirth in Nigeria every year

Maternal Figures is a database of maternal health interventions implemented in Nigeria in the last 30 years. Developed as a research tool for journalists, the database contains verified information including funding sources, contact information, programme reports, and more.

The stages of maternal health care
Pregnancy

Pregnancy signals the physiological and psychological changes that occur over a period of 40 weeks. In Nigeria, 9.2 million women and girls become pregnant each year. Complications such as maternal hypertensive disorders contribute to maternal deaths during pregnancy. Our database includes interventions like the use of Conditional Cash Transfers which encourage pregnant women to attend health screenings in order to receive cash bonuses.

42
Pregnancy interventions in our database
26%
of pregnancy interventions are policy focused

Nigeria

Interventions

75

ACTIVE

/

150

TOTAL

Free Maternal Care?

No

Funders

75

Maternal Mortality Ratio

512

Per 100,000 live births
Interventions
0
41
Interventions
  • The MotherCare project was one of the earliest global efforts made to tackle maternal mortality. MotherCare was the global maternal health project developed by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) with the goal of improving pregnancy outcomes for mothers and their newborns. MotherCare Nigeria was a 19-month offshoot of the global programme. (March 1992 to September 1993).

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed

    DPE 5966-Z-00-8083-00

    Malia Boggs

    COR/AOR , USAID


    Additional Information
    The MotherCare Nigeria project employed three strategies to guide the implementation process. First was the focus on an improvement in delivery of maternal services through the training of midwives , The second strategy was an improvement in policy formulation to 'support the expanded role of the midwives and the targeting of hospitals to function as training centers'. Third, there was the intent to influence women to change their health behavior during pregnancy so that they sought prenatal and other maternal health services. This included creating awareness about the nutritional and health problems of mothers and their newborns through social marketing.
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  • The seminal 1994 research examined factors that contribute to maternal mortality. Factors include: (1) delay the decision to seek care; (2) delay arrival at a health facility; and (3) delay the provision of adequate care. The study indicated that while distance and cost are major obstacles in the decision to seek care, the relationships are not simple. There is evidence that people often consider the quality of care more important than cost. These three factors--distance, cost and quality--alone do not give a full understanding of decision-making process. Their salience as obstacles is ultimately defined by illness-related factors, such as severity. Differential use of health services is also shaped by such variables as gender and socioeconomic status. Patients who make a timely decision to seek care can still experience delay, because the accessibility of health services is an acute problem in the developing world.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed

    NA

    Center for Population and Family Health


    Additional Information
    In rural areas, a woman with an obstetric emergency may find the closest facility equipped only for basic treatments and education, and she may have no way to reach a regional center where resources exist. Finally, arriving at the facility may not lead to the immediate commencement of treatment. Shortages of qualified staff, essential drugs and supplies, coupled with administrative delays and clinical mismanagement, become documentable contributors to maternal deaths.
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  • Situation analyses were conducted by 11 multidisciplinary teams in the West African Prevention of Maternal Mortality (PMM) Network, with technical assistance from Columbia University's Center for Population and Family Health. The research summarizes the results from eleven situation analyses conducted by the Prevention of Maternal Mortality (PMM) Network and concentrates on examining hospital utilization patterns and other health system factors contributing to deaths in childbirth.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed
    Additional Information
    Research showed that for most of the sites (those in Nigeria), the decreases in total deliveries appear to reflect increased costs to the patients for drugs and services. The declines are believed to coincide with the establishment of fees at five of the seven sites with declines. Further declines were associated with the lack of availability of drugs. Focus group research indicated that other barriers to utilization of health services in many of the areas are lack of transportation, negative staff attitudes and patient/provider relationships.
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  • Child Spacing and Family Health was a pilot project planned at the 1994 Rotary International Assembly. The project was started in two communities in Kaduna and gave training to nurses, doctors, midwives, and village health workers. It supplied poor hospitals with essential medical equipment, and it educated people about the benefits of family planning and made contraception more widely available. RFPD also set up contraception distribution cupboards in 21 hospitals. According to findings of an independent evaluation carried out by the German Foundation for World Population, Deutsche Stiftung Weltbevoelkerung (DSW), contraception use soared from 3 to 27 percent in participating hospitals during the five years of the project.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed

    NA

    Dr Adedolapo Lufadeju

    National Coordinator of the Rotarian Action Group for Population and Development (RFPD) in Nigeria


    Additional Information
    NA
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  • The Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination Initiative was launched by UNICEF, WHO and UNFPA in 1999, revitalizing the goal of MNTE as a public health problem. The definition of Neonatal Tetanus (NT) elimination as a public health problem is having less than one NT case per 1000 live births in every district per year. Maternal tetanus is assumed to be eliminated once NT elimination has been achieved. According to WHO, countries are encouraged to develop an MNT plan of action (PoA), detailing how they would proceed to eliminate MNT through the implementation of the recommended strategies. The PoA is then submitted to UNICEF or other partners for financial and technical support. One major component of most plans is the implementation of TT Supplementary Immunization Activities (TT-SIAs) in high risk districts (HRD). TT SIAs are then implemented as per the country's capacity and available resources. In 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018 and 2019, Nigeria implemented TT SIAs.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Active
    Additional Information
    NA
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Disclaimer

The information contained on this website is for information purposes only. The information is provided from research conducted by Maternal Figures, and while we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express, or implied.

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