Maternal Figures
More than 50,000 women die during childbirth in Nigeria every year

Maternal Figures is a database of maternal health interventions implemented in Nigeria in the last 30 years. Developed as a research tool for journalists, the database contains verified information including funding sources, contact information, programme reports, and more.

The stages of maternal health care
Pregnancy

Pregnancy signals the physiological and psychological changes that occur over a period of 40 weeks. In Nigeria, 9.2 million women and girls become pregnant each year. Complications such as maternal hypertensive disorders contribute to maternal deaths during pregnancy. Our database includes interventions like the use of Conditional Cash Transfers which encourage pregnant women to attend health screenings in order to receive cash bonuses.

42
Pregnancy interventions in our database
26%
of pregnancy interventions are policy focused

Nigeria

Interventions

75

ACTIVE

/

150

TOTAL

Free Maternal Care?

No

Funders

75

Maternal Mortality Ratio

512

Per 100,000 live births
Interventions
0
41
Interventions
  • In a 2011 amendment to a Lagos state criminal act, former Governor Babatunde Fashola noted that a woman could not be found criminally responsible "for any act or omission which causes the death of her child who is under the age of 12 months, if at the time of the act or omission the balance of her mind was disturbed by reason of: (a) Depression as a result of childbirth, postpartum or puerperal psychosis; or (b) previous history of depression or psychosis triggered by a re-occurrence because of childbirth or lactation/breastfeeding. (p.26) The law (p26) states that where the trial judge after ordering a medical examination finds that the balance of a woman's mind is still disturbed, he shall make an hospitalization order.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Active

    NA

    Lagos State Ministry of Health


    Additional Information
    NA
    Explore documents
    Any use of the information on this site and attached documents should attribute 'Maternal Figures'.
  • In 2012, former Nigerian President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan launched Saving One Million Lives with a goal to save one million women and children from death by 2015. The initiative focused on evidence-based and cost effective interventions that aimed to address the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Some of the programs specific objectives included: Improving Maternal, Newborn and Child Health through delivering interventions at primary health care clinics and the prevention of Mother to Child Transmission of HIV. The program was supported by federal government budgetary provisions like the Millenium Development Goal Debt Relief Grants and SURE-P, in addition to funding from other international donor agencies. After the 2015 presidential election, the program was restructured to become Saving One Million Lives Programs for Results.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed
    Additional Information
    Under the SOML program, private donor organizations like the Children Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) provided funding support to specific states with high rates of death or specific pillars of the SOML initiative. Between February 2014 - February 2015, CIFF provided $425,353 to support the work of SOML Prevention of Mother-to-Child HIV Transmission in Cross River and Akwa Ibom. In 2014, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation supported the project with $12,299,098. This shows that the amount of donor funding allocated to the SOML program has been wide ranging in amount and focus. According to a program document from the Federal Ministry of Health, the overall program costs came to $5.8 billion with existing donor and government commitment of an estimated $2.2 billion by 2015.
    Explore documents
    Any use of the information on this site and attached documents should attribute 'Maternal Figures'.
  • The Subsidy Reinvestment and Empowerment Programme (SURE-P) was launched by Goodluck Jonathan in 2012. The goal was to reinvest savings from Nigeria's fuel subsidy removal into infrastructure projects & social safety net programs. SURE-P MCH focused primarily on maternal and child health. SURE-P MCH project focused on the supply and demand side of health services. The ‘supply' focused part of the scheme involved increasing and improving both the infrastructure and human resources needed to improve health service delivery at the primary health care level. Examples of this included the renovation of health care facilities; supply equipment and medicines, and increasing the number of trained health workers like community health extension workers (CHEWs) and village health workers (VHWs) in facilities. The ‘demand creation’ component of the project aimed to increase the utilization of maternal and child health services in the primary health centres through the use of financial incentives like the Conditional Cash Transfer (CCT).

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed

    NA

    Ugo Okoli

    Former Project Director, SURE-P MCH


    Additional Information
    The scheme was initially launched in 500 primary health care (PHCs) facilities across Nigeria’s 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory (FCT) and later scaled to 1000 facilities. Over N100,000,000 NGN ($602,410) was budgeted for the CCT scheme. Women were given N5000 ($30) after completing a total of 4 antenatal care visits during the duration of their pregnancy. But reports showed that women were often payed irregularly and the scheme did not improve antenatal care use in its first 9 months despite the CCT scheme.
    Explore documents
    Any use of the information on this site and attached documents should attribute 'Maternal Figures'.
  • ZIFAS increased the coverage and quality of antenatal care using low-dose Iron and Folic Acid Supplementation (IFAS) to reduce pregnancy-related illnesses and deaths resulting from anaemia in pregnancy. Using a health system strengthening approach, ZIFAS ensured a long-term sustainable supply of ZIFAS in the public health system. The project team improved systems for forecasting and procurement as well as supply chain management, provided training for health managers and service providers, and strengthened government systems for monitoring and evaluation.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed

    NA

    DAI in UK


    Additional Information
    According to a final report for the program, The Micronutrient Initiative and PRRINN-MNCH contributed CAD 1,182,503 and CAD 1,170,061 respectively to implement ZIFAS. In addition UNICEF contributed zinc/lo-ORS stock for the four states during the program period. Select results of the program Include: a reduction in anemia prevalence among targeted women (from 71% to 62%); over a million more pregnant women receiving IFAS between Dec 2013 and Mar 2015 (from 44,542 to 1,134,078); over 187,287 pregnant women receiving and reported to consume 90+ days of IFAS in the targeted states (from 10,119 to 187,287). A 52% increase in the number of frontline health workers trained in the targeted states who can now correctly administer IFA supplements and promote key messages to improve compliance among pregnant women (from 36% to 88%) and a 98% increase in the number of pregnant women counselled in the targeted states on the importance of compliance to the recommended IFAS dose during pregnancy.
    Explore documents
    Any use of the information on this site and attached documents should attribute 'Maternal Figures'.
  • Women For Health is a DFID funded project aimed at addressing the rural staffing shortages of women health workers in five northern states. Since November 2012, W4H has increased the number and capacity of female health workers in Borno, Jigawa, Kano, Katsina, Yobe, and Zamfara by: Improving the capacity of colleges of nursing and midwifery and colleges of health technology to train female health workers, improving the accreditation status and training capacity of health training colleges, and increasing graduation rates; Improving the recruitment, deployment, and retention of midwives in rural facilities while implementing a Foundation Year Training Programme, or access course, for rural women to improve their academic credentials, study skills, and confidence to enter health worker training; Engaging with community, religious, and training institutions to create a gender-friendly environment for women to pursue health careers, and facilitating locally led scale-up; Institutionalising short-term courses and modules in the curriculum to prepare health workers for deployment in conflict settings and humanitarian programming.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Active

    GB-1-202694

    DAI in Nigeria


    Additional Information
    In the extension phase between April 2018 and October 2020, W4H plans to adapt to the emerging context and new challenges in the North, including expanding into Borno State. It will focus on a “building back better” approach in the conflict and humanitarian areas in Yobe and Borno states, and will ensure sustainability of the progress achieved over the last five years in Katsina, Kano, Jigawa and Zamfara.
    Explore documents
    Any use of the information on this site and attached documents should attribute 'Maternal Figures'.

Know an intervention that we haven’t listed?

Submit Intervention
Disclaimer

The information contained on this website is for information purposes only. The information is provided from research conducted by Maternal Figures, and while we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express, or implied.

Newsletter

Sign up for our newsletter to receive updates about our work and be the first to know when we update our database.