Maternal Figures
More than 50,000 women die during childbirth in Nigeria every year

Maternal Figures is a database of maternal health interventions implemented in Nigeria in the last 30 years. Developed as a research tool for journalists, the database contains verified information including funding sources, contact information, programme reports, and more.

The stages of maternal health care
Pregnancy

Pregnancy signals the physiological and psychological changes that occur over a period of 40 weeks. In Nigeria, 9.2 million women and girls become pregnant each year. Complications such as maternal hypertensive disorders contribute to maternal deaths during pregnancy. Our database includes interventions like the use of Conditional Cash Transfers which encourage pregnant women to attend health screenings in order to receive cash bonuses.

42
Pregnancy interventions in our database
26%
of pregnancy interventions are policy focused

Nigeria

Interventions

75

ACTIVE

/

150

TOTAL

Free Maternal Care?

No

Funders

75

Maternal Mortality Ratio

512

Per 100,000 live births
Interventions
0
41
Interventions
  • In 2004, Nigeria adopted the National Policy on Population for Sustainable Development (NPP), with an end date of 2015 for most of its targets. The policy aimed to improve standards of living and quality of life for Nigeria’s people by addressing the complex interrelationships between population and development. One of the NPP National Targets was to reduce maternal mortality ratio to 75 per 100,000 live births by 2015. In 2017, the Federal Government pledged to implement a pragmatic and acceptable National Population Policy (NPP) for sustainable national development goals.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Active

    NA

    National Population Commission


    Additional Information
    In 2015, the National Population Commission through the Population Technical Working Group—with support from the Health Policy Project, funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)— conducted an implementation assessment of the policy. Responses included: (1) Nearly two-thirds of respondents had never read any part of the policy itself, demonstrating a lack of familiarity with much of its content. Three quarters of interviewees rated themselves as having little to no NPP content knowledge. (2) The majority of interviewees believed that the goals, objectives, and targets were not achievable within the 2004–2015 timeframe. Interviewees also stated that the lack of zonal or state disaggregation of targets impeded progress. In 2019, Dr Ghajji Bello, the Director General of the National Population Commission said that "the policy, if implemented, will result in improved maternal health and that of the newborn children."
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  • The three key approaches of the Improvement of Maternal Health - Prevention and Treatment of Obstetric Fistula project included creating awareness and advocacy campaigns about the dangers of obstetric fistula, prevention and treatment of obstetric fistula including rehabilitation, and quality assurance in obstetrics, including the training of health personnel. In March 2010 the state governments of Kano and Kaduna took over the project and committed themselves to maintain it enhancing its positive results. The Nigerian MDG office promised to fund still needed equipment and training of doctors and midwives.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed

    53403

    Adedolapo Lufadeju

    National Coordinator of the Rotarian Action Group for Population and Development (RFPD) in Nigeria


    Additional Information
    Some of the projects results included: (1) The introduction and anchoring of quality assurance in ten selected hospitals (2) Achieving a reduction of maternal mortality in these hospitals by more than 50%; (3) The establishment of two specialized fistula wards (one per state) including rehabilitation facilities and provision of needed hospital equipment; 1,500 fistula patients were successfully treated (500 more than planned) and rehabilitated - many of them also got vocational training and microcredits to built up their own small businesses. (4) Seven doctors were trained as fistula surgeons and 15 ward nurses were trained in fistula care. (5) 43 doctors, 344 nurses and midwives, 200 CHEWS and 197 TBAs were trained on how to improve obstetric services in the ten selected hospitals. (6) Hospitals lacking theses facilities were provided with water and solar energy (satellite project); (7) 24,000 mosquito nets were provided to the selected hospitals and surrounding communities (satellite project) (8) 3,000 IUDs were distributed to the selected hospitals (donation from Bayer Schering) (9) TBAs were equipped with delivery kits and anti-shock garments (satellite project) (10) Hospitals were provided with drugs for Preventing Mother-to-Child Transmission (PMTCT) of HIV (donation from Boehringer Ingelheim).
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  • In 2005, a total of 564 women were operated on during the "Fistula Fortnight," a two-week surgical effort organized by UNFPA, the United Nations Population Fund, to treat women living with obstetric fistula and train doctors in repair techniques at four sites in northern Nigeria. The “Fistula Fortnight” ran from 21 February through 6 March. The event was part of a UNFPA-led global Campaign to End Fistula, launched in 2003. UNFPA joined forces for the two-week pilot project with Federal and State Nigerian Governments, Virgin Unite, the Nigerian Red Cross, Volunteer Service Overseas, Nigerian non-governmental organizations and health professionals from Nigeria, the United Kingdom and the United States.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed

    NA

    UNFPA Campaign to End Fistula


    Additional Information
    According to a UNFPA report, In preparation for the Fistula Fortnight, twelve Nigerian doctors, forty nurses, forty social workers, and twenty Red Cross volunteers were trained in fistula management and counselling. The state governments of Kano, Katsina, Kebbi and Sokoto committed in 2004 to placing the trained nurses and doctors at the four fistula centres in which the Fortnight was to take place at the conclusion of their training in February 2005. Additionally, the state governments began facility renovations to strengthen the capacity of the centres in preparation for the Fortnight The report also stated that Nigeria received an estimated total of $180,949 USD in 2004 from the US Committee for UNFPA, UNFPA Core Resources and the Government of Finland for Campaign to End Fistula related activity.
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  • Partnership for Reviving Routine Immunization in Northern Nigeria / Maternal Newborn and Child Health (PRRINN/MNCH) is one of the most notable maternal and child healthcare programs in Northern Nigeria. It was jointly funded by the U.K. Department for International Development and the State Department of the Norwegian Government The program started in 2006 as PRRINN, a DFID-funded health systems project with a focus on state-wide routine immunization activities in four Northern states (£19 million). The total funding for the programme for the period 2006- 2013 is £65 million. Over this period the DFID contribution has been approximately £38 million and Norway has contributed approximately £27 million.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed

    GB-1-104227

    DAI in Nigeria


    Additional Information
    According to Health Partners International, a major aspect of PRRINN-MNCH was to mitigate the weakness and fragmentation of the health system. To address this Primary Health Care Under One Roof (PHCUOR) was rolled out to enhance coordination, collaboration, effectiveness and efficiency as well as eliminating constraints, fragmentation, managerial uncertainty and wastage of resources. PHCUOR becoming national policy in 2011 and 23 states adopted the policy. PRRINN-MNCH also sought to improve access to financial resources in the health sector, which included major financing reforms with significant impact on government’s health budgeting and planning, particularly by bringing all financing under a single budget. To strengthen PHC delivery in Zamfara state a pooled fund (called the Basket Fund) was created. State, local government and development partners all contributed to the pool fund, which was used for tasks such as supervision, vaccine distribution and outreach services. PRRINN-MNCH rolled out the District Health Information Systems 2 (DHIS2) across implementation states, in collaboration with Health Information Systems Program – Nigeria (HISP Nigeria) and also successfully pioneered the use of the mobile version of the software. At the end of the project all four PRRINN-MNCH states were using DHIS2. PRRINN-MNCH developed and implemented a human resource information system (HRIS) that was used to capture baseline HR information, plan for equitable distribution of health workers within an affordable envelope and support administration of human resources. The HRIS empowered state managers to address problems such as ghost workers, absenteeism and maldistribution and shortage of health workers, especially female health workers. According to Transaid, the establishment of the Emergency Transport System in Katsina, Yobe, and Zamfara was done through PRRINN-MNCH.
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  • ACCESS (Access to Clinical and Community Maternal, Neonatal and Women’s Health Services) was a USAID program implemented with support from organizations like JHPIEGO, missions, governments, nongovernmental organizations, local communities and partner agencies in developing countries to expand coverage, access and use of maternal and newborn health services and improve household health behaviors and practices.

    Locations and Funding

    Present in State

    Not Present in State

    Project Status

    Completed

    620-A-00-10-00007-00

    Kayode Morenikeji

    Activity Manager, (MCHIP) USAID Nigeria


    Additional Information
    The goal of the ACCESS/Nigeria Project was the same as that stated in the Federal Ministry of Health’s (FMOH) National Reproductive Health Policy – “to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality in Nigeria” - and “to accelerate the reduction of maternal and newborn mortality and the attainment of the Millennium Development Goals in Nigeria.” The ACCESS/Nigeria project approach for achieving this goal was through the implementation of integrated community and facility-based maternity and EmONC interventions including antenatal and postnatal care and FP, while ensuring a “household-to-hospital continuum of care” (HHCC). The ACCESS/Nigeria approach focused on increasing both the supply of and the demand for quality interventions.
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Disclaimer

The information contained on this website is for information purposes only. The information is provided from research conducted by Maternal Figures, and while we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express, or implied.

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